Anxiety, GAD, Life, PTSD, Writing

To My Future Husband: The Vows I Can’t Say Out Loud

To my future husband,

As the days begin to countdown, far too quickly in my opinion, and we rush to finish last-minute wedding plans, making sure all our affairs are in order – gifts bought, cake topper selected, heckling people for late RSVP’s – I can’t help but take a moment to reflect back on how far we have come, of all that we have been through and to be hopeful in all we have yet to see.

And even though we have our ceremony planned and songs picked to walk down the aisle to, there are still some vows that I won’t get the chance to say to you on our wedding day. There are some promises that I don’t have the courage to say out loud to you, in front of all our friends and family. For these vows are too hard, and too deep, for me to recite to you.

But even though I don’t have the strength to say them to you out loud, I still want you to hear them, because I mean every single word; for these vows are as precious to me as the ring you placed on my finger.

With everything that I am, I make these silent vows to you.

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LBGTQ2S, Writing

It’s About More Than Just a Crosswalk

I’m going to take a minute to deviate today to discuss a very important issue that is happening here in my home province of Newfoundland and Labrador.

Last week in Springdale, NL, the town council voted “No” against the high school’s Gender Sexuality Alliance society’s petition to paint a rainbow crosswalk in the town. What followed next was a questionable and embarrassing statement from the Mayor, who stated that it would “divide” the town rather than promote inclusion, further stating that by agreeing to paint a crosswalk for the GSA society also meant having to say “Yes” to other groups, like “coloured people” and such.

Of course, anyone with a social media account and access to Facebook completely lost their minds. The comments and shares ranged from people (Canadian icons alike) showing their support to the GSA students, to those who were completely against the crosswalk. As you can imagine, the comments on the issue have been quite “colourful”, and unfortunately, quite ignorant as well.

Because the conversation was not only focussing on the issue of whether or not the council would repeal their vote, but also the issue of how much small towns in Newfoundland are actually supportive of the LGBTQ community.

Following today’s announcement, the council of Springdale stuck to its decision to deny the GSA society its petition for a rainbow crosswalk, and of course, social media platforms are having another field day filled with colourful comments and disheartening slurs.

And through some of the negative and hateful comments I saw floating around, I decided I could no long simply stay “quiet” about the issue.

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Grief, Writing

When Death Gives Us Perspective

Things have been quiet here on Fighting the Good Fight lately.

For my devoted followers and supporters, I apologize for my absence over this last month, but myself and my family have been dealing with the sudden loss of my uncle. A mere three weeks after learning of his cancer diagnosis, he passed away and my family and I have been reeling ever since. It has been a hard few weeks filled with dread and undescribable sadness until I had to drop everything and run. There was no time to think, just react.

And for my blog followers, I hope you can understand this sudden absence.

This past month for me has been a difficult time, both from listening to the pain and urgency from family members over the phone, to my eventual trip home to attend the wake. I didn’t really begin to process all my own feelings and grief until I on the highway headed back to my own city.

None of us had time to process he was sick, let alone accept the fact that he was gone. Grief affects everyone differently, which was how I found myself staring at a computer for the last three weeks unable to write, words completely failing me. It’s not that I get writer’s block during profound sad periods in my life (because my best work is written during my low moments), but for me, working on my writing projects again meant having to finally accept he was gone, and I just wasn’t ready.

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Anxiety, Mental Health, PTSD, Writing

New Year, Same Illness

I started off my 2018 the best way I know how.

By finishing another manuscript to one of the many novels I am working on. (Cue loud cheering!) After months of hunkering down and locking myself up in my writing den, I finally finished my NL novel, which is now officially titled, Where the Land Meets the Sea. Hopefully, with much luck and wishful thinking, I can get it published later this year.

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There is no better feeling in the world than holding a completed manuscript for the first time! ❤

But besides finishing another novel that I poured my blood, sweat, and tears into, I’m sure like many of you, I too sat down and wrote out some New Year resolutions and some goals I wanted to have completed by the end of 2018, both personal and professional.

And while maybe I have already broken a few of them (cutting back on Tim Horton’s ice capps…I am failing miserably so far!), there are some things in my life, no matter now much I plot and plan for, I have no control over.

That includes my mental health issues. Keep Reading!

Books, Mental Health, Writing

A Whole Lot of Lemonade (And a Whole Lot of Love)

Life can be pretty bitter.

Sometimes we experience events or go through circumstances that chip away parts of us, moments that change us forever, sometimes for the worse. When trying times come, the results can leave us wounded or sour – bitter.

Though difficult circumstances may change us or leave behind scars unhealed, sometimes through darkness we can see the light. Sometimes the events that make us bitter can have a silver lining after all.

Getting pelted with lemons isn’t necessary a bad thing. It’s what you do with the lemons after that defines you. Do you throw them away and let the bitterness eat away at you, or do you use the lemons and make something sweet – something good?

Would you rather reach for the tequila or make lemonade?

And boy is that a hard decision to make!

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Books, Mental Health, PTSD, Writing

Lemonade Stand (Official Author Debut)

(Author Note: If you would like to purchase a copy of Lemonade Stand, selling information can be found at the bottom of this post!)

A wise man once said, “A dream doesn’t become reality through magic; it takes sweat, determination, and hard work.”

And I am proud to announce that after many months of hard work, sleepless nights, a lot of tears and frustrations, I can officially say for the first time, “I am a published author”!! Keep Reading!

Writing

The Woes of a Millennial

(Rambling) Food for thought.

The Woes of a Millennial

I come from a generation where we are both revered and highly criticized, where success is measured by how many likes you can get on an Instagram post and how finding true love is equated to a mathematical code where you are paired with “matching” individuals – or if you’re not interested, you can just swipe left.

A generation that has been deemed “over-zealous” and “self-righteous”, and sinners for putting science before religion. A generation that is so underemployed and consumed by mountains of debt that suicide rates for young adults is the seconding leading cause of death to our nation. But let’s not talk about that, let’s talk about how my generation is responsible for the demise of fabric softener companies. (You think I’m kidding? Google it.)

So what generation am I talking about?

I’m a person who is over-education, underemployed, godless, and selfish?

Who am I?

That’s right. I’m a Millennial. Keep Reading!